Italian White Bean Soup with Fresh Rosemary and Basil

Italian white bean soup

Soup is hearty, nourishing, and satisfying

Hearty and nourishing, Italian white bean soup is what you need to sustain you through a long work day, when taking care of children or nursing a baby, to refuel after a workout, or frankly anytime you want a satisfying meal. This plant-based soup is chock full of vitamins and minerals that are easy for your body to assimilate because all of the vegetables, beans, and sea salt are cooked together in a broth. Bean soups generally reheat well, so make a double or triple batch so that you can store some in the freezer and thaw it out for last-minute weeknight meals. I always add some fresh greens like baby spinach or kale when reheating my soup on the stove. It adds freshness and color to what would otherwise be a boring leftover meal.


Homemade or canned beans?

You can sub 2 cans of white beans for the homemade beans in this recipe, but it will not be as delicious. Homemade beans are truly wonderful, more digestible (when soaked, drained, and cooked with kombu) and flavorful than canned, but you do have to plan ahead. I usually soak a big batch of beans every week or two, and cook them until soft and season with sea salt. If you use a pressure cooker, it cuts down on the cooking time. I freeze whatever I’m not going to use in the next few days in quart-sized freezer bags. When it comes time to make a soup I thaw out a bag of beans instead of having to start from scratch. More detailed instructions on how to make beans from scratch are in my posts Homemade Black Beans and Macrobiotic-style Giant Peruvian Lima Beans.


Fresh ingredients are the key to a delicious soup

Choose ingredients that are fresh and full of life. If celery or carrots have gone limp, you can perk them up by cutting a little slice off the bottom of each vegetable and stand up in a quart-sized mason jar filled halfway with water. Within 30-60 minutes your vegetables should be rehydrated and ready to use. The last few years I’ve been growing fresh herbs in pots on my back porch. You can even put a little planter in a sunny windowsill if you don’t have a yard or porch to garden in. It’s amazing how much more delicious herbs are when picked right before you use them.


Learn how to prep veggies with skill and ease with my knife skills cooking video

Once you have a few knife skills under your belt it is so easy to whip together a big pot of soup. Check out my latest cooking video on how to slice and dice veggies for this soup here. In the video I show how to dice an onion into perfectly even pieces, how to slice a zucchini into half or quarter moons, how to dice carrots, and how to slice celery on the bias.

 

Italian White Bean Soup with Fresh Rosemary and Basil
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Italian, Macrobiotic, Vegan, Gluten-Free
Serves: 4-6 servings
Ingredients
  • Beans
  • 1 cup dried organic white beans (cannellini, navy, or giant white lima)
  • kombu, 1” square
  • spring or filtered water
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • Soup
  • 1 small yellow onion or sweet onion, diced
  • pinch unrefined sea salt
  • 1 tablespoons organic extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, sliced in diagonals
  • 1 zucchini, sliced in quarter moons
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced
  • 4 cups water or vegetable stock (Imagine brand no-chicken vegetable stock
  • recommended)
  • ¼ cup fresh basil, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley leaves, chopped
  • sea salt, to taste
Instructions
Beans
  1. Sort, rinse, and soak the beans in spring or filtered water overnight. When beans are rehydrated, discard the bean soaking water.
  2. In medium pot, add beans and enough water to cover beans by about 2 inches and bring to a boil. Skim foam and add kombu. Cover, turn to low, and simmer until beans are tender. Season with sea salt and set aside. Alternatively, pressure cook white beans instead of boiling after skimming foam and adding kombu. Once beans are up to pressure with lid locked, turn to low and cook for about 15 minutes. Then turn off heat and let come down from pressure naturally before opening up pot.
Soup
  1. In medium-sized soup pot, sauté onion with a pinch of sea salt in olive oil until soft.
  2. Add carrots, celery, zucchini, garlic, and rosemary, and cook a few minutes more.
  3. Add cooked beans and water or stock. Simmer for about 10-15 minutes, until flavors are blended.
  4. Add basil and season with more sea salt, if needed.
  5. Garnish with fresh parsley or other seasonal herbs and serve warm.
Variations
  1. Garnish with pieces of pan-fried dulse instead of parsley.
  2. When reheating, add a handful of baby spinach or kale.
  3. Make a large batch and freeze half to warm up later.
  4. Use chicken stock or chicken bone broth in place of the vegetable stock.
  5. Add 1 cup cooked shredded chicken for a heartier soup.

 

Watch these videos I made with Dr. Jonathan Schultz of Family First Chiropractic (Austin, TX) on making Italian White Bean Soup with Fresh Rosemary and Basil:

Italian White Bean Soup video:

 

Knife skills and veggie prep for Italian White Bean Soup video:

 

Related recipes on my blog:

Italian Chickpea Soup with Fusilli Pasta

Giant Peruvian Lima Beans

Homemade Black Bean

 

Upcoming Classes and Workshops:

I’m teaching the kids’ cooking classes at Con’ Olio Oils and Vinegars shop in the Arboretum (NW Austin) this summer! Please check out the schedule here.

For the schedule of classes at my home in SW Austin, click here.

For private and group classes, click here.

Corporate team building workshops centered around cooking and wellness:

Check out my web site for corporate team building and contact me if you have a group interested in doing a workshop with me!

Italian Chickpea Soup with Fusilli Pasta

Over the years, this Italian Chickpea Soup has been a family favorite and has always gone over well with children visiting our home.The addition of pasta makes the soup heartier, like a minestrone, and can definitely be considered a one-pot meal.

I recently had the opportunity to teach a cooking class at my daughter’s elementary classroom where I decided to serve the soup with pasta and bread, which was a real hit! An added bonus is how economical this recipe is. We made this recipe X4, which fed about 35 people, using all organic ingredients, for under $2 per person including soup, pasta, bread, and butter.

Day 1 of our cooking class involved walking to the grocery store, selecting our groceries, and carrying our groceries back in a wagon! When we got back to the classroom, we soaked the chickpeas so they would be ready to cook the following day.

Day 2 of our cooking class involved cooking the chickpeas in the pressure cooker, and slicing, dicing, and sautéing vegetables for the soup.

The secret to making this soup delicious is to make your chickpeas from scratch. Make your chickpeas in advance, as it takes a good 8-10 hours to rehydrate the dried chickpeas (I usually do this step overnight), and some more time to cook them. I use a pressure-cooker to make my chickpeas, but they can be made in a regular pot (it just takes longer). I recommend making a big batch of chickpeas and freezing some away in quart-sized freezer bags that you can use later on to make hummus or another batch of soup. Here is my recipe for Homemade Chickpeas.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Italian Chickpea Soup with Pasta
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Vegetarian
Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 recipe Homemade Chickpeas or 3 cups cooked chickpeas
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced
  • 2 medium carrots, sliced into rounds or half moons
  • 2 medium zucchini, sliced into half or quarter moons
  • 4 cups vegetable stock or water
  • 1 organic bay leaf
  • ½ cup fresh parsley or basil leaves, chopped, divided
  • 2 cups cooked pasta (such as farfalle, fusilli, twists, wheels, or shells)
  • ½ cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Pecorino Romano (optional)
  • sea salt, to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Follow instructions for making Homemade Chickpeas. Set chickpeas aside. Do not drain, as the chickpea cooking liquid will be used in the soup. If using canned chickpeas you will need to drain the liquid from the can.
  2. In 3- to 5-quart soup pot, sauté onion in 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of sea salt for about 10 minutes over medium or medium-low heat. Add rosemary and stir to coat onions. Add another tablespoon olive oil, celery, carrot, and another pinch sea salt and sauté about 10 minutes more. Adjust heat if necessary to prevent burning. Add zucchini and sauté a minute more.
  3. Place chickpeas and chickpea cooking liquid into soup pot and add stock and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then turn heat to low, cover, and simmer until zucchini is soft, about 8 minutes. Add half of fresh herbs. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  4. Serve pasta in soup bowls and pour chickpea soup over the pasta.
  5. Garnish each bowl with remaining fresh herbs and/or grated cheese (if using).
Notes:
  1. Make this recipe gluten-free by using a gluten-free variety of pasta.
  2. If using canned chickpeas, add 3 cloves minced garlic along with carrots and celery.

By noon our cooking crew was ready to serve their homemade soup, pasta, and bread to the class.

Enjoy making soup on a cold winter day and share with some friends!

Creamy Butternut Squash Soup with Fresh Rosemary and Basil

creamy butternut squash soup

Creamy Butternut Squash Soup… this is what talked me into becoming a macrobiotic chef! It is sweet, savory, comforting, and delicious! As a child, the only way I saw butternut squash cooked was in a baked casserole with sour cream, onions, and a corn flake topping. I didn’t like it. But when I tried this soup, I was in heaven! I have recently revised this recipe to include a long, slow caramelization of onion, carrot, and celery (mirepoix) at the beginning, which gives the soup a very sweet, complex, and delicious flavor.

By Pigup – I made the mirepoix at home and took a picture of it on my cell phone., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18688674

Creamy vegetable soups help stabilize blood sugar levels, so help prevent sugar cravings when eaten regularly. When using organic squash, there is no need to remove the skin. This makes it much faster to make, and adds beneficial dietary fiber. These days, finding food that is naturally sweet and nutritious is so important, to nourish the body while curbing cravings for refined sugar. I recently listened to a news story on NPR’s “Here & Now” about how the food industry engineers processed and prepared food items (including pasta sauce, yogurt, and other processed foods not thought to be “sugary”) so that they reach a person’s “bliss point.” Children are especially susceptible to getting hooked on these foods since they are naturally attracted to the sweet taste (which is needed for growth in mild, natural forms). Try making this soup for your children, and try substituting other vegetables for the butternut squash, such as carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini, or sweet potato. It makes a great kids’ lunchbox item when carried in a thermos.

The only trick with making this soup is learning how to cut the squash without cutting yourself. You need a good, sharp chef knife and a large cutting board. I suggest trimming off the stem, cutting off the “neck” of the squash, then cutting the resulting pieces (neck and bulb) in half so that you have four pieces you can put down flat on the board. From there you can remove the seeds from the bulbous part of the squash and chop the squash into small pieces.

Enjoy this soup and try some of the variations suggested at the bottom of the recipe. They are all delicious!

Creamy Butternut Squash Soup with Fresh Rosemary and Basil
 
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Serve this soup at lunchtime to curb sugar cravings later on in the day. Or start your dinner meal with a cup of this soup to warm digestion and stimulate appetite.
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Macrobiotic
Serves: 4-6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 cup yellow onion, finely diced
  • ½ cup carrot, finely diced
  • ½ cup celery, finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • pinch sea salt
  • 5 cups butternut squash, seeded and cubed
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced
  • 3 cups spring or filtered water or light vegetable stock
  • 5 fresh basil leaves, sliced thinly (chiffonade)
  • sea salt, to taste
  • ¼ cup organic pumpkin seeds, toasted, for garnish
Instructions
  1. In a 4-quart soup pot, sauté onion and pinch of sea salt in olive oil over medium-low heat until translucent.
  2. Add carrot and celery and another pinch of sea salt. Sauté another 15 minutes, until vegetables start to caramelize.
  3. Add butternut squash and rosemary and coat with onion mixture. Add enough water or vegetable stock to barely cover the squash (about 3 cups), cover, and bring to a boil. Turn heat to low and cover. Simmer until squash is soft, about 10-15 minutes.
  4. Puree with blender or immersion blender. If soup is too thick, add a little more water or vegetable stock. Season to taste with sea salt.
  5. Simmer on low heat for another 5 minutes.
  6. Serve in bowls and garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds.
Note
  1. If using vegetable stock, try to find one without tomatoes (such as Imagine brand Vegetarian No-Chicken Broth) or make your own, to avoid overpowering the flavor of the squash.
Variations
  1. Substitute kabocha squash for butternut squash. The color will be darker but it is very delicious.
  2. Substitute carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, zucchini, sweet potato, or sweet corn for the butternut squash.
  3. Use herbs and spices of choice instead of rosemary, such as thyme, basil, or fresh ginger.
  4. Roast butternut squash tossed in olive oil and sea salt in 425 degree F oven until soft. Add to sautéed onions and proceed with recipe.

Bon appétit!

 

Cecilia’s Pozole Verde

pozole verde

Mmm… Posole soup! Cecilia Torres, my friend and former student, sent me this recipe for Pozole Verde after returning home to León, Mexico this winter. Upon finishing her culinary studies at The Natural Epicurean, she got right back to work cooking amazing things in her kitchen, including the creation of authentic Mexican versions of recipes we did in class. They are all incredibly beautiful! Be sure to check out Cecilia’s food pictures on Instagram.

Pozole or posole refers to the large type of corn as well as the soup made with it. Perhaps you are familiar with pork or chicken-based pozole soups that are stewed for a whole day or two. This version is much fresher, greener, and gets its flavor from the poszole corn and the delicious verde sauce made with roasted poblanos, tomatillos, and lettuce. Flavorful ingredients are made fresh to top the soup with, making it fun for kids of all ages to customize their own bowls.

Cecilia's Pozole Verde
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Serves: 8 servings
Ingredients
Soup
  • 4 cups pozole corn, soaked overnight
  • 4 cups vegetable stock or filtered water, or more as needed
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 roasted poblano peppers, peeled, seeded, and diced
  • 2 pounds green tomatillo, chopped in halves or quarters
  • ½ head iceberg or romaine lettuce, chopped
  • 1 or 2 xoconostles, peeled and seeded (optional)
  • reserved pozole cooking liquid
  • vegetable stock or filtered water, as needed
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
Toppings
  • cooked pozole (see instructions above)
  • 3 cups mushrooms, sliced and sautéed
  • ½ head iceberg or romaine lettuce, shredded
  • ½ bunch red radishes, julienned
  • ½ yellow or white onion, minced
  • 2 avocados, sliced
  • ½ bunch cilantro leaves
  • 4 limes, sliced into wedges
Instructions
  1. Cook pozole in water or vegetables stock until soft, 60-90 minutes. Drain, reserving liquid for soup base. Set aside.
  2. Sauté onion in olive oil until translucent.
  3. Add garlic, peppers, tomatillos, and lettuce and cook until vegetables are soft and bright green.
  4. Pour sautéed vegetables into a blender with reserved pozole cooking liquid and more vegetable stock (if needed) to make a creamy soup base.
  5. Pour soup base into a saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat.
  6. Add more vegetable stock to reach the desired consistency of your soup. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. Serve toppings in separate bowls with spoons so that each person can serve up a bowl of soup and put the toppings they would like in their bowl.
Variations
  1. Sauté cooked pozole in olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt and chile powder. The result is a beautiful and tasty pozole to garnish the soup with.
  2. Use sliced zucchini in place of some or all of the poblano peppers for a milder version.
  3. Pickle thin radish rounds in umeboshi vinegar for about an hour before serving the soup, and use as a topping.

 

Here is the the version I made with Nelson at home yesterday. We added zucchini and serrano pepper (as we forgot to buy the poblanos) as well as a little shredded chicken we had leftover from making a chicken stock. It was still amazing! Another thing we tried was to sauté the cooked pozole corn in olive oil with ground Ancho chile and salt. It had a beautiful color and amazing flavor when added to the soup as a garnish.

Here is a photo of Cecilia and I at the Vegan Thanksgiving class we taught together at the Natural Epicurean in November 2016. I miss her so much!

Cecilia and Rachel cooking together at The Natural Epicurean- November 2016
Cecilia and Rachel cooking together at The Natural Epicurean- November 2016

Miso Vegetable Soup

Miso soup, a Japanese tradition, is an integral part of a healthy, modern diet, and can be made with all-American ingredients. My family loves to make this soup for breakfast, as it is light and easy to digest, soothing to the stomach, and chock full of minerals. Miso soup is a great start to any meal, as it stimulates digestion and prepares the stomach to receive food. Miso soup, which contains wakame seaweed, is long known to be good for air travelers because it is alkalizing, hydrating, good for regularity, and mitigates the negative effects of radiation you are exposed to at high altitudes.The good news is that miso soup can be made simply in just 5-10 minutes, after a little bit of practice. Make your soup fresh each time, as it loses its vitality if it sits for a day or longer.

There are just 5 components of this quick and healthy miso soup:

  1. Water or vegetable stock
  2. Wakame sea vegetable
  3. Sliced land vegetable(s)
  4. Unpasteurized miso
  5. Garnish

Miso soup (1)Wakame is the most common sea vegetable used in miso soup. Although sea vegetables are often associated with Asian diets, there are a number of great sea vegetable compnies on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States. I usually buy Atlantic wakame (or Alaria) from Ironbound Island Seaweed (also locally available at Wheatsville Coop) where sea vegetables are hand harvested and sun-dried. Maine Coast Sea Vegetables and Maine Seaweed are also wonderful companies specializing in sustainably harvested seaweed.

Miso is a high-protein seasoning that offers a nutritious balance of natural carbohydrates, essential oils, minerals, vitamins, and protein, containing all of the essential amino acids. It is usually made with soybeans, cultured rice or barley, and salt. I look for miso that is traditionally made, as it is the highest in quality. It should be unpasteurized and produced with organic, non-gmo soybeans (or some other kind of bean), organic rice or barley koji, and sea salt. No alcohol or other preservatives are used in making this kinds of miso. My favorite brands that I can buy locally (or order online if I want a special variety) are South River Miso from Conway, Massachusetts and Miso Master made in North Carolina.

There are many delicious miso varieties to choose from when making miso soup. Some of the ones that I prefer to use in the hot Texas climate are chickpea miso, sweet white or yellow miso, or a combination of red miso and a lighter colored miso (stir together half and half).

Here is a compelling video about the miso making process at New England’s South River Miso Company which produces traditionally made, superior quality misos at their Massachusetts facility. Check out their web site for additional information and videos.

Before adding miso paste to your soup, dissolve it in a small cup with some warm water or soup broth. Whisk it until it is a smooth mixture, then add it into the soup at the point the vegetables are done cooking.

Any vegetables of your choice can be used in miso soup. I like to slice them thinly so that my soup will cook quickly. Some of my favorites include: shiitake mushrooms, celery, daikon radish, sweet potato, carrot, and baby bok choy. I usually choose about two vegetables to put into my soup each time. Including a garnish for miso soup is essential for having a fresh touch to an otherwise cooked soup. I like to use thinly sliced scallions, grated daikon radish, or fresh parsley to top my soup for color, texture, and flavor.

Miso Vegetable Soup
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Japanese, Macrobiotic
Serves: 2 servings
Ingredients
  • 3 cups filtered or spring water or vegetable stock
  • 2 strips wakame sea vegetable or pinch of wakame flakes
  • 1 cup thinly sliced vegetables
  • 1-2 tablespoons unpasteurized miso paste
  • 1 scallion, sliced into very thin rounds
Instructions
  1. Heat water or stock in small saucepan.
  2. Add wakame strips or flakes. Wakame flakes will instantly rehydrate. Wakame strips take a little longer. If using wakame strips, remove them from the pot and slice into small squares that are bite-sized and return to the soup pot.
  3. Add vegetables and simmer for a minute or two. If vegetables are sliced very thinly, this will only take about one minute.
  4. Whisk together miso and a little of the hot soup broth in a small cup or bowl until smooth. Add miso to soup pot, stir, and turn off the heat. Miso will appear to "bloom" in the pot, which is a sign it is ready to serve.
  5. Ladle a cup or so of the soup into a small soup bowl or cup.
  6. Sprinkle gently with scallion slices for garnish. Serve and enjoy!
Notes
  1. Some delicious vegetable combinations include: celery and carrot or daikon, shiitake mushrooms and baby bok choy, or sweet potato or winter squash and baby bok choy.
  2. Miso varieties can include any light or dark misos. In warmer weather you may prefer a lighter miso such as chickpea, sweet brown rice, yellow, or sweet white miso. In colder weather you may want a stronger, saltier miso such as 3-year barley, chickpea and barley, red, or hatcho (the darkest variety).
  3. Other garnishes can include: grated daikon radish, pan-toasted mochi cubes, fresh parsley, or other fresh herbs.

 

 

 

Creamy Corn Soup with Dulse

vegan corn soup

It is almost time for fresh sweet corn in most parts of the United States! Take advantage of the season and make this fresh corn soup. In this recipe, dulse is pan-fried until crispy and used to garnish the sweet and creamy soup. Dulse is a salty sea vegetable high in minerals that can be used in place of bacon or ham in sandwiches, salads, and soups. This soup can be served warm or cool.  You may also garnish with fresh basil, mint, cilantro (as pictured), and/or scallion instead of dulse.

Creamy Corn Soup with Dulse
 
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Macrobiotic
Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
  • 3 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 organic yellow onion, finely chopped
  • Sea salt, to taste (SI brand recommended)
  • 3 cups fresh or frozen sweet corn kernels
  • Filtered or spring water
  • ½ cup dulse, torn into small pieces, for garnish
Instructions
  1. In a medium-sized soup pot, sauté onion in 2 teaspoons olive oil with a pinch of sea salt for five minutes.
  2. Add sweet corn and sauté for 2 more minutes.
  3. Add enough water just to cover vegetables. Simmer for 10 minutes.
  4. Blend with an immersion blender or vitamix until smooth.
  5. In a cast-iron skillet, pan-fry dulse in 1 teaspoon olive oil until crispy.
  6. Season with sea salt to taste and garnish with pan-fried dulse.

 

Creamy Broccoli Soup with Fresh Rosemary

Easy to prepare and deeply nourishing! This soup can be varied according to what vegetables you have on hand– substitute carrots, winter squash, sweet corn, or zucchini for the broccoli if you wish. Also, feel free to substitute a light vegetable stock (without tomatoes) for the water for a richer soup. Let me know what variations you come up with.

Creamy Broccoli Soup with Fresh Rosemary
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Macrobiotic
Serves: 4-6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 organic yellow onion, diced
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • pinch unrefined sea salt
  • 4 cups broccoli, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced
  • spring or filtered water
  • unrefined sea salt, to taste
  • 1⁄4 cup pumpkin seeds, toasted
Instructions
  1. In large soup pot, sauté onion in olive oil and a pinch of sea salt until soft. Add broccoli and rosemary and sauté a few minutes more.
  2. Add enough water to barely cover the broccoli, cover, and bring to a boil. Turn heat to low and simmer until broccoli is tender, about 8 minutes.
  3. Puree with food mill, blender, or immersion blender. Season to taste with sea salt. Simmer for another 5 minutes to let salt incorporate into the dish.
  4. Serve in bowls and garnish with toasted pumpkin seeds.

 

Roasted Carrot and Fennel Soup

Spring is the perfect time in Central Texas to get farm fresh fennel and carrots. I couldn’t resist making this simple soup today for a client when I saw the big bulbs of fennel at the market. The flavors are much sweeter and complex due to the roasting of the carrots and fennel prior to adding them to the soup. Reserve fennel stems and core for juicing, if you wish.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Roasted Carrot and Fennel Soup
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: Macrobiotic
Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 pound organic carrots
  • 1 large organic fennel bulb
  • 3 tablespoons organic extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 cup diced organic yellow onion
  • 4-6 cups light vegetable stock (no-tomato)
  • sea salt, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fennel fronds, for garnish
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Wash carrots and trim off the ends. Slice carrots into ½-inch diagonals. Place in a large glass baking dish or roasting pan.
  3. Wash fennel and trim off stems and fronds, reserving a few fronds for garnishing. Slice fennel bulb into quarters, cut out the core, and discard the core. Slice remaining fennel bulb into ½-inch slices and add to carrots in baking dish.
  4. Toss carrots and fennel with 2 tablespoons olive oil and sprinkle generously with sea salt. Cover baking dish with foil and roast for about 30 minutes, or until vegetables are tender and are beginning to brown slightly.
  5. Meanwhile, saute onion, a pinch of sea salt, and remaining tablespoon of olive oil in large soup pot over medium heat until the onion is soft and translucent.
  6. Add roasted carrots and fennel to soup pot and saute a minute more.
  7. Add 4 cups vegetable stock, or enough stock to just cover the vegetables. Simmer until flavors blend, about 10 minutes.
  8. Blend the soup in the pot with an immersion blender until smooth. Add more stock as needed to achieve the consistency you like. It is important not to add too much liquid initially as it will be difficult to achieve a smooth texture.
  9. Season with sea salt and simmer gently for 10 minutes more.
  10. Serve warm or chilled in individual bowls with a few fennel fronds for garnish.